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at 9:15, the impact of new leadership in china on u.s. relations. president obama traveling in parts of asia. we will have those segments, plus, we will take a look at the papers and take your phone calls as well "washington journal ."shington, we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, a discussion on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on fa
to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they
with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
's a double feature this afternoon, and i have the privilege of also introducing to you our next speaker, u.s. senator-elect ted cruz from texas. it was two years ago when ted cruz came up to me and others here in this room saying he was contemplating a run for the u.s. senate and asked for reaction. trying hard not to pour water over ted's noble commitment to public service, i resisted what would roll out of our topings -- tongues when a friend confronts us with advise. are you crazy? do you have a fever? have you sought professional help for this behavior? [laughter] taking a slightly different tact, i asked the usual questions. is it the right time politically? do you think the money's there? is your family prepared for this? have you checked all the necessary boxes back home in texas? now, as any of you know ted would guess, looked reflective and discerning at the questions, but you knew he was optimistic and just raring to go. he wanted to do this. from the experiences with the bush campaign and his bid for attorney regime, he knew he was ready for the political fray, and while he probab
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> just ahead, a series of discussions by the world affairs council of america exploring national security issues facing the u.s. up first, former national security adviser steven hadley. he talks about the economic impact on national security. then a panel of former ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiativ
militants on the u.s. diplomatic outpost if benghazi being the fault of a youtube video, that was very bad for her. she would compound a problem that the departure of hillary clinton would help alleviate. state department's been really under close scrutiny because of the response to this. the lack of preparation for it, for the attack and the response thereafter, that's something they would like to get away from. putting susan rice in there would intensify it. megyn: last but not least, quickly, if geithner goes, i mean, that's an important job he has. and who is likely to fill that role, and how would it change americans', you know, day-to-day lives? >> well, what the president has in tim geithner's departure is an -- or assumed departure is an opportunity to send a message to the business community that he heard their complaints and is concerned, shares their concerns about issues like debt and the stopgap way that we're running the government these days. so there you'd look for somebody with a bernanke-style business credential, somebody who is, you know, they got geithner from the new
week before house lawmakers concerning the deadly attack on u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. molly henneberg is live in washington with the very latest on this story. >> molly: now that he stepped down, general david petraeus will not testify this up coming week at house and senate intelligence xheet committee hearings investigating the benghazi. some on capitol hill they do want to hear from him in the future. >> i hope we don't have to subpoena a four-star general and former c.i.a. director. i hope he would come voluntarily. if he won't, he will be subpoenaed. >> molly: petraeus who had been in charge of the c.i.a. since september 2011 has said the attack was in response to a protest over an anti-islam video. one g.o.p. congressman is asking questions about the timing of his departure. >> it comes days before he is set to testify before the house intelligence committee. it really begs the question what did the f.b.i. know and whether did they know it? how long did they sit on the information? i recall that petraeus briefed the senate about what happened in benghazi. did he have t
about the u.s. economy. i think consumers are where it's at. we just got to get over this fiscal cliff thing. >> jonathan capehart. >> i learned president morsi of egypt is fanatical about "planet of the apes." >> that is really all you need to know. jonathan, thank you so much. rana, steve, michael and everybody, thank you for watching today. if it's "way too early," it's "morning joe." chuck todd is next with "the daily rundown." >>> together again. mitt romney makes his way to the white house. it's not exactly the way he wanted to get there. but can something constructive come out of a private lunch between president obama and the man he defeated just three weeks ago? that's right. that was just three weeks ago. >>> also this morning, a deep dive into america's longest war. look into lessons learned and the sacrifices made by troops at one combat outpost. tell us about what's been accomplished and what's not in more than a decade of fighting. as the country wakes up obsessed with numbers and winners, for the lottery, that, we've got a very important update on the election night numb
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
>>> up next on a second look, the first woman ever to serve on the u.s. supreme court. in her own words how sandra day o'conner got the call from president reagan. the most difficult case she faced and her latest crusade to change the way judges are chosen. >>> a legal pioneer returned to the bay area last month. 82-year-old stanford graduate sandra day o'conner. the first woman to serve as a justice was in san francisco for an appearance at the o'conner club. president reagan appointed her in 1981. >> president reagan appointed the first woman to serve. a couple of people were asked to check my record. there was plenty of old newspapers and stuff about me. so they had to check it all out. >> no -- that the time. >> no no -- at that time. not too long after i was sitting in my chambers at the court of appeals in arizona, and the phone rang and it was the white house calling. president reagan said, sandra. yes mr. president. i would like to announce your nomination for u.s. supreme court, is that all right with you. well-- gulp. what do you say to that? i don't know. i guess mr.
is the new big task facing barack obama and the u.s. congress. gridlock over the so-called fiscal cliff. what's the fiscal or better put financial cliff? think of it as a high, steep rock. a ledge the u.s. is teetering on and will plunge over if no action is taken on certain financial matters. what are those? one, the bush era tax cuts. in 2001 and 2003, congress, under president george w. bush, lowered everyone's taxes. but it was only temporary, like 11 years temporary. less than two months from now midnight december 31, taxes go back up. the average household will pay more in taxes each year, $2000 to $3500 more. two, sequestration. what's that? new, big budget cuts. $110 billion in cuts in 2013 alone. they go into effect january 2, and will affect the defense budget and the domestic budget. the cbo, says unemployment could climb up over 9%, pushing the u.s. back into recession. why did this happen? an automatic sequestration or permanent set aside of $1.2 trillion was passed by congress, in order to force congress to compromise and figure out how to cut the budget itself. but, a congressi
appointments, an inclination for restraint. i want to appoint judges who understand as a u.s. supreme court explained, that law is something more than the mere -- law is something more than mere will exerted as an act of power. if you think about being governor of a state like florida, your biggest legacy is probably your judges. we appointed about just over 80 judges now so far in 22 months, and so these are the individuals that are beginning to help -- decide whether we have three branches of government. i just remember civics, class, three branches of government, and i made sure everybody always remembers that in my state. the election is over. we may not be happy with the current occupant of the white house, but the question is what are we going to do about it? will you take action or stay on the sidelines? will you join the fight for conservative solutions with states like florida where we are fighting for families by creating jobs, quality education, and keeping the cost of living low? the time for arguing over who caused the problems has ended. now it is the time to break from the ca
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
consulate and killed four americans including u.s. ambassador christopher stevens. both the house and the senate want to know what went wrong, what members of the obama administration knew, what they knew it and why tke th-pbt do more to prevent the attack or respond in time. chief intelligent correspondent catherine herridge is live on capital hill with all of this. catherine the latest. let's start with the testimony of general petraeus and the testimony we just heard about that secretary clinton will attend. >> well, thank you, jenna and good morning. two important developments here on capitol hill. fox' confirmation this morning that the former cia director david petraeus will testify before the house and senate intelligence committees. these will be closed or classified sessions early friday morning, and also confirmation that secretary of state hillary clinton will testify here on the hill and give the read out, or the results of their internal review at the state department about the benghazi attack, and that announcement was made at the house foreign affairs committee a sh
rights all the time. in our state i want to have honest, fair elections. if you are not u.s. citizen you don't have the right to vote in our state. there was a federal database called save our homeland security we asked for that we as taxpayers paid for the we have a right to end it -- that wouldn't give it to us so we ended up in a lawsuit and we won. we won because we are on the right side. we have to look at every day about our own state sovereignty and what our own rights are. goes back to the alexander hamilton quote. for all of us is individuals weathered is economic freedom or just freedom to live our lives the way we want to we have got to focus on states rights because if we don't and the federal government will run everything about our lives. let me thank you for the opportunity to be here, thank you for what you do every day. have a great day. >> the u.s. constitution and to screen court republican senator mike lee of utah and ted crews of texas. this is about an hour. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. our mid afternoon session. good afternoon. my name is leonard leo an
if you are a member of the u.s. senate and the fbi has been trying to talk to this man in tunisia. tunisia has said no and then you and senator chandliss got into it two nights ago and voila, you could talk to him. >> i wrote a letter three days ago to the ambassador, u.s. ambassador, tunisia ambassador to the united states saying this is a defining moment in our relationship. i know tunisia well. i know the prime minister. and within two days we were able to get the fbi on the ground. i want to thank the tunisian government for making this person available to be interviewed by our lawenforcemr investigative team. it is not enough to write questions. you have to be on the ground to look people in the eye and too yearia came through and two days after the letter here we are. >> greta: and it is quite extraordinary because the investigation has been stuck and my hat goes off to you forgetting it down, for picking up the ball and running with it. but the president of the united states i suspect has just as much influence if not more than two u.s. senators so what is your explanation
that we're going. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofu
. iranian warplanes opening fire an unarmed u.s. drone? the pentagon said it was flying over the gulf. that international waters. fortunately the drone was not damaged. jon: all this as the you know announce as fresh round of new diplomatic talks with iran next month. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live at the pentagon with more on this. this happened november 1st. why are we hearing about it now? >> reporter: that is a good question, jon. i don't have the impression that the pentagon wanted to talk about the incident. reporters were getting wind about the incident. were asking questions about and that's when we heard officially from pentagon spokesman george little. >> it will come up here that the white house might have asked you to muzzle this incident before the election. did the white house give you any guidance whether or not to release information on the incident or not? >> i think said this two, three, four, five, times, now. we don't typically comment on classified surveillance missions. i will not get into discussions at the classified level that occurred b
, and as recently as the 1990s, that number would have been in the 20s. u.s. exports in ten years went from 25% to developing countries to 50%. combined with what we heard about europe and in a sense the demographic problems in japan, there's a shift in the international system you're going on, and a lot of those countries will also have challenges like in china with avoiding the middle income trap and the structural shift, but what i want to connect to is this stuff we're doing at home in the united states is not enough. the united states then needs an international economic strategy, some of the things that prime minister asner talked about so it leverages a domestic revival with a new international growth system because the old system is no longer going to exist in the old form, and we got rising economies, and you got markets there, africa grew at 5% a year for the decade before the crisis and now back on the growth progeek story. there's potential in all of them. >> can they keep up the pace of growth they demonstrated in the last ten years? we're already seeing china slow down. the last
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. quacks' of calling. >> exactly. -- >> of calling. >> exactly. honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the faaffect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is done,
of strengthening the u.s./japanese alliance. when it comes to china as the two largest global economies both china and the united states have a responsibility to ensure sustained and balanced economic growth. this is the president's first trip abroad since his re-election. and he's been able to fill in some more details on shifting u.s. economic and security forces toward southeast asia and the pacific. but the visit is overshadowed by other international issues in the spotlight. amongst the asia pacific community, that would be the battle over the south china sea which involves china cambodia and the philippines. while that's one of asia's biggest security issues right now, it's paling in comparison to what's going on in the middle east. fighting between israel and hamas continued again yesterday. the palestinian death toll is now up near 100 and many of those people are civilians. president obama and bill clinton both took to the phones yesterday, speaking with benjamin netanyahu of israel and president mohammed morsi of
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
or a back door in the system. again, let me just try to catch up. that is the u.s. government excluding the intelligence community. let us presume, and i do not know the number, i do not want to know the number, let us presume those other top 17 agencies in the intelligence community are having an equal number of attempted intrusions. add another 45,000 to these -- 90,000 incidents per year. that is roughly one attempted intrusion every five minutes. state,, let's add local, tribal governments. in that vast pool we call the private sector, private industry -- the numbers go through the roof, even conservatively. i am leading toward an understanding that cyber attacks and intrusions are kind of a continuum. they're happening all the time. going at all the different sectors. now again, from that gao report, if you look at the types of intrusions being reported, you have in this pie chart here, 31% of the incidents reported are still under investigation. something happened, something abnormal. we got a warning somebody tried to get in or a computer system crashes and we try to repeat it an
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
, see that as a stabilizing function. at the end of the day when you have the capacity as u.s. military for power protection as well. that is a global capability, but that means their respective of choices that are made by other powers, we want the ability to sustain our presence in the asia-pacific, same is true around the globe. as you look at these different areas, i think there are terrific opportunities to engage with china on each of them. and to finally ask the question and try to answer the question the secretary clinton has been encased in for quite some time and that is, can we get a better answer than we physically had in the past to how a new rising power comes into the international system? in other words, can we do so without running significant risks or falling into conflict? >> thank you. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary said. in fact, the admiral locklear _ those points the other day in australia, talking about the engagement in that strategic trust again. it is interesting the chinese tend to look at the american asia-pacific pivot as a sort of containment
major powers including the u.s. plus iran that there may be possibly secret bilateral explorations between u.s. and iranian representative just to see what kind of deal is possible. what kind of deal with satisfy the u.s. and israel that iran won't have a bomb and won't have the capability to break out to having one. so that's got to be resolved early in the new year or the u.s. warnings that unless this is resolved, all options are on the table will suddenly become very immediate, as will israel's threat to acting. that's the first thing on my list. i've got a bunch of others. i'd start -- >> let's take that one first. >> we'll stay with that one. richard haass, would you put that on the top of your list? >> for traditional foreign policy challenges, yes. what you want to do is smoke the iranians out. go out with an ambitious negotiating offer and learn one of two things. there is a possibility of an outcome we can live with, or we'll learn there's not, in which case we've got a degree of clarity and then we could face what could be an almost existential choice for us, whether we'
. the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, john allen. the defense secretary leon panetta says the pentagon has launched an internal investigation into thousands of quote, inappropriate communications between general allen right there on the screen and that woman in yellow, kelly. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live in washington. you almost need like one of those boards to put all the pictures up, catherine. >> reporter: you do rick. beyond the issue of failing to notify congress about the fbi investigation the democratic chair of the senate intelligence committee is threatening to subpoena a report summarizing director petraeus's trip to libya when he personally looked into the fwauz gauze attack. he personally interviewed cia staff on the ground in libya including the station chief and the report may be only in unfinish draft form. the departure was sudden and unexpected even by the director. so far virtually every known investigative thread in the case now leads back to jill kelly, a woman described as an unpaid social liaison for the military in tampa, florida. thi
the executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles. he was the first chief of the u.s. office of citizenship, appointed by president george w. bush. alfonso is responsible for developing initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the founder and ceo of texas immigration solutions. to 2011, he was the order of houston-area -- owner of houst on-area restaurants. his group seeks to develop conservative solutions to immigration policy but he served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is the president of the southern baptist convention's official added to address social, moral, and ethical concerns, with a particular attention to impact on american families and their faith. he is also the editor of a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics, and cultural trends. last but not least, my friend ramesh ponnuru, senior editor for "national review" magazine an
, but that all changed for me in october of 2008 when i got a call from my boss, u.s. attorney, mike garcia. he called me in the office, and i have the oh, my god, it's the principal's office feeling in the pit of the stomach. he handed me a printout, special inspector general, it was a piece of the legislation that congress passed authorizing treasury to borrow $700 billion to rescue wall street, bail out the banks, put us on a path supposedly to economic recovery. this piece i was not aware of was when they passed the law, congress created a brand new agency. when mike explained to me what was the agency was going to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to
are learning new details on iran's attempt to shoot down an unmanned u.s. aircraft. last week two russian-designed iranian warplanes fired and missed the drone as it flew in international air space. the pentagon says this will not change america's mission in the region. >> the united states communicated to the iranians we'll continue to conduct surveillance flights in international waters over the arabian gulf consistent with long standing practice in our commitment to security in the region. martha: peter doocy is live in washington. if this happens as we are now learning over a week ago, why didn't when find out about it before the election? >> reporter: the pentagon says they kept the lid on details of this incident until yesterday because the drone mission was classified. but a spokesman said it was a routine surveillance mission to monitor maritime shipping and this unmanned, unarmed drone never flew over iranian turf. >> our aircraft was never in iranian air space. it was always flying in international air space. the international recognized territorial limit is 12 nautical miles of
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